Tip Toeing Through the TULIP (or, I watched nine hours of John Piper so you don’t have to)

Many in the Reformed community have attacked me as “immature” in the faith, or even unsaved, because I don’t accept every point of Calvinism. When I expressed pain and that I was thinking of ending it all, only one showed any concern. Was it because I wasn’t one of them?

Calvinism seems to hinge on the doctrine of election, which I cannot embrace (One thing I cannot get around when it comes to particular redemption is a verse tucked away in Acts 13:48, “And when the Gentiles heard this, they began rejoicing and glorifying the word of the Lord, and as many as were appointed to eternal life believed”.)

Well, I’m not here to please everyone, and I’ll say that some act like cultists, even like atheists, who want to be “right” and members of an exclusive club. Mayhaps if they explained their positions more clearly, and showed love toward fellow believers who doubt or question some of their views, some degree of understanding could be reached. Hey, want an irony? A Calvinist that’s allergic to tulips.

A Bit of Orange

I wasn’t raised a Calvinist, but I have been immersed in Calvinistic churches for a long many years now, and most of the pastors I listened to on line have been Calvinists. So, I knew it existed, and I knew Calvinism was locked in an eternal struggle against the evil forces of Armenianism.

Those filthy heretics.

This is the hand that slapped a thousand Arminians like Will Smith slapped Chris Rock!

And the fact is, it’s not something a lot of pastors tend to address directly. It’s sort of a background assumption that they hold, but don’t talk about, like the value of the Electoral College, or the bennefits of Vitamin D. And with the knowledge that Calvinism is rooted in the clear teaching of scripture, I occasionally wondered how ANYONE could be foolish enough to be an Arminian. But it slowly began to occur to me that, as long…

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You know what? DON’T Believe ALL Women (Or Pet Raccoons)

It’s been interesting to see this case tried in the court of public opinion by people who are ready to slap leather with each other. These jaspers don’t know all the facts. How often does this happen, anyway? As I’ve said many times, people “think” with their emotions, but do not do more than pet the trash pandas.

A Bit of Orange

I’m about to make a case for NOT believing all women, but before I do, I want to state that this case is built on the foundation of the equality between the genders. Of which there are only two.

And while I’m blowing the minds of my Leftist friends, I’ll even define “Woman” for you: An adult human female.

I guess I’m overqualified for the Supreme Court. But I digress.

The Johnny Depp/Amber Heard defecation lawsuit… oh, excuse me, Defamation lawsuit has been playing nonstop, live on the internet for a couple of weeks now as if it’s an important soccer match between Brazil and England. Here’s why it is happening:

Apparently Ms. Heard wrote an article in a major newspaper accusing Mr. Depp of being abusive to her during their marriage, describing herself as a victim of domestic abuse. Because of the #MeToo movement, and the subsequent “Believe…

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Turning Red Turns Pixar into a Middle School Pimp

The Disney company has been showing signs of political correctness, wokeness, and just plain arrogance for years. Now they are way over any lines of decency. Read this article to see what’s going on with the garbage panda.

A Bit of Orange

How about that title, huh? Attention grabbing! But far from being click-bait, I am about to argue that the creative minds behind Pixar’s Turning Red have made a 90 minute advertisement for middle school girls to get into… adult entertainment and the sex trades.

Wow, I feel dirty just saying this stuff. But, here we go.

Turning Red is Trash

TheWrap spoke to director Domee Shi (making her feature directorial debut) and producer Lindsey Collins. You can find it here.

The tile of this article is, as you will see if you follow the link is

‘Turning Red’ Director Domee Shi and Producer Lindsey Collins on Making Pixar’s Horniest Movie Yet
(The filmmakers open up about puberty and red pandas)

Yup. That’s what THEY said about this movie. But, WAIT. It gets worse.

Director Domee Shi says this about her intent in making this movie:

I just thought with this…

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A Matter of Faith — Movie Review

by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

This child is often late to the party when it comes to reviewing books, movies, and videos. In this case, A Matter of Faith is a movie from October 2014. God’s Not Dead, which I have not seen, was released in March of that year. I watched this one on 30 April 2022.

Irrelevant, but a fun surprise for me is that it was filmed in Grand Rapids, Michigan. I know the area, having lived near there for several years.

Christian movies are like getting grub from the chuckwagon: depends on who is doing the cooking. The genre has a reputation for Pollyanna-style material and bad acting, and some of that is deserved. For example, the A Thief in the Night films that began in 1972 had a good message about the end times, but acting and production were often poor. If I recollect rightly, the last two were improvements over the first ones.

To be fair, the movie industry is known for being hostile to presenting Christians in a positive light, so enthusiastic Christians filmmakers work with low budgets and whomever they can get to work in front of and behind the cameras. Many are using actors who make no pretense at Christianity, but still do their roles in a professional manner.

Things are changing. While many Christian movies suffer from weak writing, it is incorrect to assume that if it’s faith-based, it’s going to be bad. Can’t be using the genetic fallacy and rejecting the entire genre, we have to judge them on their own merits.

Here’s what happened that brought A Matter of Faith to my attention. YouTube recommends videos, so I looked. The entire movie is available there on a channel supposedly owned by the Christiano brothers of Five & Two Pictures who made it. It can be seen on the cutely-named Freevee (formerly IMDB TV), which is owned by Amazon (an Amazon account is required to use it, but not the overpriced Prime). It is also on Pluto and Tubi. Note that selections change, so it may not be on any of those tomorrow.

I went to IMDB and saw that it had a user review score of 3.7 out of 10. Atheists were out in force to vote the movie down. It’s who they are and what they do. Some were saying “worst movie ever made”, and one hatetheist equated it with ISIS propaganda (hyperbole much?), plus other extremely negative claims against Christianity — especially creation science.

After all, they are compelled to protect their fundamentally-flawed origins mythology because it is foundational to atheism. Many of the reviews did not show any knowledge of the movie beyond having watched the trailer, but yee haw boy howdy, they sure did use the word propaganda quite a bit.

One sidewinder said it had the “same merit as a Jonestown Koolaid commercial” and “I think the purpose of making this terrible movie was to try to enlist new members to a rapidly dwindling cult using hollow logic and citing mythical situations as “proof” to support their weak indoctrination attempt.” I could triple the length of this article by examining the false claims and blatant hypocrisy of many reviews, but we need to move on.

Rachel Whitaker was raised in a Christian home and she is going off to college. Her biology class is taught by Professor Kaman (Harry Anderson of Night Court fame), who has an agenda. He promises that if students attend the classes, they are guaranteed a passing grade. That’s a mite suspicious.

During her first few weeks, Rachel is too busy for church or reading her Bible. Professor Kaman, being the caiman that he is, makes bold evolutionary pronouncements with “evidence” that is strictly conjecture, and Rachel is accepting seeds of doubt.

Her father, Steven Whitaker, is upset that Kaman teaches evolution. (Where has he been? The secular science industry and academia are saturated with people who have a worldview based on atheistic naturalism for many years.) Steve visits the professor to respectfully complain about the evolution-only curriculum. Since the college needs a topic for an upcoming debate series, the professor cajoles Steve into debating him.

One trick is saying, “Evolution versus creationism“, and when -ism is used, it has a negative connotation for many people. That was the title of the debate. However (and this puts burrs under the saddles of fundamentalist evolutionists), both creationism and evolutionism can both be used. Indeed, many creationists have no problem with the word creationism.

A professor with training in evolutionism and a passel of experience in public speaking will debate an inexperienced parent of a student. Seems legit. Actually, biblical creation scientists have a difficult time in getting their secular counterparts to debate. Their challenges are declined or ignored most of the time. If Kaman wanted a hot topic for debate, he could have found several qualified creationists who would oblige.

Please pay attention. Although the professor is an atheist and evolutionist, he say, “I teach what my textbooks tells me to teach,” then praises evolutionary scientists. However, parents who take solace in the fact that there are Christian teachers in the public school system are deceiving themself. The reason is that, like Kaman implies, the curriculum given by the state takes priority.

Another student named Evan met Rachel and said that he had taken Kaman’s biology course. He pointed out that Kaman has an agenda and tried to get her thinking.

Rachel’s father wants to get is message out to Rachel and other students. She is appalled — appalled, I tell you — that her father is going to do the debate. Professor Kaman won’t change his beliefs. Also, it will “ruin me on campus!” Apparently nobody considered the possibility that if Steve pulled out, he would be labeled a coward and things would be worse for her.

A glaring error in the movie is that it was claimed that Kaman teaches that we evolved from apes. According to evolutionary beliefs, humans and apes evolved from a common ancestor. (The fact that our putative ancestors sure did look like apes apparently has no bearing on the situation.) The “evolved from apes” thing is something creationists should avoid.

Another weak point in the movie is something that should be discussed. Too many Christians and creationists attempt to defend our views with “memes” and clever sayings that would fit on bumper stickers, but are woefully unprepared in witnessing to atheists and evolutionists. These folks get slapped down by opponents who have learned their talking points and boilerplate rhetoric. Rachel’s father knew what he believed, but not why, and was unable to defend his position in the debate.

Kaman (if he had a first name other than Professor, I missed it) used rhetorical tricks including assertions, appeal to emotion, false definitions (including the common atheistic definition of faith), straw man, and more. He also used the category error of demanding scientific proof of God. While some may claim that the movie makers were creating a straw many with the way Kaman presented his arguments, other creationists and I have seen such things many times.

In addition, there are indeed professors who are openly hostile to Christianity and especially to creation. This Kaman jasper is a representation of many reports that drop down over the transom.

I left out details that would spoil the movie for y’all, but there were a couple of surprises. One had the professor giving what was said in the debate some thought afterward. There is no “everybody gets saved, let’s have a group hug” ending, but there were some unexpected events well as a couple of things that could be predicted by viewers.

A Matter of Faith was recommended by Creation Ministries International, Answers in Genesis, and others. It has some flaws beyond what I have said, but my agenda is to encourage people who watch it and keep in mind some of the things I have said. Ask yourselves and each other questions. F’rinstance, how would layman Steve have fared against Kaman if he had prepared from the numerous materials available online provided by creationists? How about if he knew and used a presuppositional approach?

To make the movie more realistic, they could have done a full, formal debate. (It would also have been quite a bit longer.) I mentioned earlier that Rachel told her father that he would not change Kaufman’s views. That almost never happens in a debate, although it may happen later. Good debates are for each side to present their viewpoints, and to see if they can withstand scrutiny. If you can spare 2-1/2 hours, I highly recommend the “Does God Exist?” debate between Dr. Greg Bahnsen and Dr. Gordon Stein.

Again, I recommend that Christians and biblical creationists see A Matter of Faith. They can spot some flaws, and learn about doing apologetics. Also pay attention and notice that evolutionists live by faith themselves.

Do demons exist? What does Jesus do about them?

Volumes have been written about demonology, but much of that seems contrived. The demonic hierarchy uses biblical names, but this child thinks they are synonymous and not separate beings, for instance. This article provides some succinct information that does not exceed what is written in Scripture.

Jesus Quotes and God Thoughts

SPIRITUAL WARFARE | Put on the Armor of God - Inspirational & Motivational Video - YouTubeWhy this is important: The Bible speaks of demonsas real, actual beings. However, Scripture’s depiction of demons is very different from the popular concept of them. The Bible describes demons as powerful but limited and ultimately defeated creatures. They are angels who followed Satan in rebellion against God.

 Then another sign appeared in heaven: There was a great fiery red dragon having seven heads and ten horns, and on its heads were seven crowns. Its tail swept away a third of the stars in heaven and hurled them to the earth. And the dragon stood in front of the woman who was about to give birth, so that when she did give birth it might devour her child. She gave birth to a Son, a male who is going to rule all nations with an iron rod. Her child was caught up to God and to his throne. 6…

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The Crucifixion and Counting to Three

Jesus was crucified between two thieves, buried, and bodily arose after three days. Credit: RGBStock / Bartek Ambrozik

Most Christians around the world celebrate the bodily Resurrection of Jesus from the dead on a day that is commonly called Easter. (And no, it is not a “pagan holiday”, nor is it wrong for us to celebrate. Read the material at the links here so you can savvy that, Sam.) Obviously, before he could rise again, he had to die. That day is usually called Good Friday, and many of us observe that day as well.

It seems strange that the day Jesus suffered the most horrible death known is called “good.” It was good for us, as this B.C. comic succinctly puts it. Got Questions explains:

Why is Good Friday referred to as “good”? What the Jewish authorities and Romans did to Jesus was definitely not good (see Matthew chapters 26-27). However, the results of Christ’s death are very good! Romans 5:8, “But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” First Peter 3:18 tells us, “For Christ died for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, to bring you to God. He was put to death in the body but made alive by the Spirit.”

https://www.gotquestions.org/Good-Friday.html

Although mockers try to say that if the Crucifixion was on Friday and the Resurrection was on Sunday, that’s not three days. Cults also do this for some reason. I remember seeing a television show from one that made this claim. There are honest people who also have puzzled about how three days can be reconciled with Friday afternoon through Sunday morning.

It takes a little bit of homework. Hebrews had a different way of reckoning time. We use the Roman system where a day is split into two halves, but you may have noticed in your Bible that certain things happened at a certain hour, such as when Peter and John went up to the temple at the ninth hour (Acts 3:1), which was about three in the afternoon. Some Bibles render that as “three in the afternoon.”

I say about because they didn’t exactly have digital watches, or even grandfather clocks using weights and pendulums. So, an hour wasn’t. Not really, because hours were based on the amount of sunlight in the day. There were twelve hours in a Jewish day, but as for night, it seems that nobody cared very much; there were watches in the night.

With these things in mind, it should come as no surprise to learn that the Jews counted days differently as well. Modern tend to impose their own cultures, experiences, and opinions on texts of ancient cultures. Someone today, 15 April, could say, “I’ll see you in three days”, and the other person says, “Okay, this is Friday at noon. So I’ll see you…let’s see…Saturday, Sunday, Monday. We’ll meet here at noon on Monday. Bring burgers.”

By letting the ancient culture “say” what it means and not forcing our own views on it, we see there is neither problem nor contradiction. To read an explanation, saddle up and ride over to “Three Days and Nights.” Also, you may be interested in a free digital download pack of “The 10 Minute Bible Journey Easter Accounts.” Go through the purchase process at the Answers in Genesis online bookstore, but it really is free.

Catastrophic Eggs

Save this article, as it is of profound significance to millions of people.

Like pastors, biblical creation science authors need a break from heavy theological and science reading — and writing. Right, SlimJim? See why I make Chef Robert Irvine cry with this in-a-hurry concoction.

Most of this is prefabricated stuff from big chain market store things:

  • Frozen precooked sausage patty
  • Frozen precooked hash brown patty
  • Packaged shredded cheese
  • Worcestershire sauce*
  • Salt and pepper
  • Two eggs

Grab a non-stick skillet. Even though it’s non-stick, I put in olive oil, or butter, or spray it with non-stick spray. Never use a metal spatula in those pans (we really like the ones made from silicon). Put it on medium-high heat.

Zap the pair of patties in the microwave on high heat for 1-1/2 to 2 minutes. I use a small paper plate, but you might want to use a microwave-safe plate.

While that’s going on, crack the eggs, put them in the pan, add cheese, Worcestershire sauce*, salt, pepper (measure each of these carefully with the “that looks about right” method), stir them all together.

Chop up the hash brown and sausage patties into an unrecognizable pile. Artistically scrape them into the frying pan with the other mix. Stir, flip, stir, pick up larger chunks that flipped out of the pan and put them back.

When it seems to be done (especially the eggs), gracefully dump the mix onto a plate. How long did that take, less than ten minutes?

*Hot sauce or red pepper flakes are an option for people who don’t have to avoid spicy foods.

Ringing Down the Curtain?

Announcement on the probable demise of The Question Evolution Project on Facebook in the coming days.

Here is a slightly modified version of the post I made at The Question Evolution Project on Facebook. Or is it Forcebook, since they have forced Why?Outreach out, and we may be next while Fakebook puts on an innocent face and asks, “What? Not our fault.”

Bill Engvall said,

My Uncle Jack. We are at the funeral, and we weren’t even outside. We were in the church! And the reverend had just finished his eulogy, when we heard psshhh! And everyone turned to Uncle Jack, who was holding a beer, going, “What?”

I will be the last Admin for TQEP. Hey, I’m getting up in years and my health is not all that great. When I die, the Page dies with me.

So, here is the post with a few tweaks.

It is 31 March where I am, so it’s not an April Fool prank.

The Question Evolution Project may disappear in the next few weeks. Likely, but not guaranteed. We’ll see what happens. Hopefully, we’ll be here to celebrate Resurrection Sunday.

No, we’re not quitting because of lack of evidence (quite the contrary!) or feckless atheopaths. Facebook may have found a way to shut down Pages that do not comply with their agenda but still look innocent.

One Admin is facing losing his account because reasons and stuff. The owner of Why?Outreach lost the battle from the same “security” problem.

“Your account has the potential to reach a lot more people than an average Facebook user. Hackers are often motivated to attack accounts that have a lot of followers, run important Pages, or hold some community significance.”

Sounds legit, but we’re less than 10,000 “likes”, and most of those seldom return. That’s typical for Pages.

Later on in the email,

“Note: Facebook Protect isn’t available to everyone on Facebook. We require stronger security for your account because it has the potential to reach a large audience.”

Aha! I’ll wager lotsa grotzits (well, I would if I wasn’t broke) that it’s a punishment for not being leftist and standing on the authority of the Word of God.

Gary (an Admin) can’t verify his cell phone number with incompetent Facebook because they never send the code, and then he’ll be locked out of his account! Makes perfect sense.

This is just another form of censorship.

After we posted things opposing things that Fakebook supports (including two genders, consider all evidence regarding cl!mage change, and opposing a few other leftist causes including evolutionism), we came under then shadowban very hard. Views plummeted. They’ve done it before, but this is the worst.

Then the hypocrites want us to run our “business” from Facebook, and also want our money. That’ll be the day! We get stats telling us our views are down. Well, they throttled us. Diddly dur hey!

Results of Facebook shadowban
Used under US Federal Fair Use provisions for educational purposes

So, for people who care, pray if you’ve a mind to. Well, it’s been over ten years. If that Admin can’t get things resolved, there will be only me. And you can be sure that won’t last long. Don’t be surprised if Fascistbook rings down the curtain on The Question Evolution Project.

If people come to MeWe, I may set something up there or use a group where I’ve been made an Admin.

As for me, my main sites are:
Piltdown Superman
Biblical Creation and Evangelism (once a week):
Radaractive (once a week)
Others are more intermittent.

For personal stuff, I’m most active on MeWe
Twitter (but I suspect shadowbanning there, too):
Why?Outreach is on Parler. So am I, but not too pleased with the platform. He can be reached here.

ADDENDUM: Too bad I can’t put color behind just one word. Anyway, the account under discussion was connected moments ago (14:14 Eastern Time). However, knowing Fakebook, that could change. This still got me thinking about what I should be doing, my options, starting over with TQEP 2.0, and so on.

Image credit up top: Pexels / Mikhail Nilov

The Eric Hedin Saga Continues

Professional #liar4darwin proselytizer Jerry Coyne made some outrageous (possibly libelous) claims about Eric Hedin. It appears that he is not only opposed to free speech, but freedom of thought as well. Must protect the atheistic narrative, you betcha!

sixdaysblog

I’ve previously written about Physicist Eric Hedin and the censorship he faced at Ball State University, so this post is a follow-up to the ongoing saga. I admit it’s a little lengthy, but thorough.

Militant atheists came after Hedin and forced the college to shut down his classes because he was accused of teaching religion in the classroom.

Censorship is a serious thing because it only allows for the strongest voice to be heard at the expense of dissenting views. All others must be silenced. In this way the truth can be suppressed in order to preserve a favored viewpoint.

In the case of Hedin, Ball State University approved the course and its description, which was titled, The Boundaries of Science. The university intended to have a course delve into larger, societal issues and implications. Thus Hedin engaged students by asking philosophical questions, such as how human significance…

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